life beyond the well…

The State of Education in Georgia

6 Comments

This article made me REALLY sad this morning…

An excerpt:

“Georgia school leaders were so shocked by dismal scores on state math and social studies tests, the state superintendent released a statement Monday to prepare parents and others for the results.

According to the unofficial results, only 20 to 30 percent of Georgia’s sixth- and seventh-graders passed the state social studies exam. In math, about 40 percent of eighth-graders could be held back because they failed the test.

The state will release official scores from the Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests next month.

Parents whose children failed the math test will be notified by local schools. The state requires eighth-graders to pass the reading and math exams to move to high school.

Students who failed math exams — as well as those who might have failed reading — can retake the exam this summer. Schools will provide optional free classes to get them ready. Students who failed the social studies exam don’t face any consequences under Georgia law.”

I’m frustrated by the low test scores…and the fact that there’s no consequences for failing the Social Studies exam- basically saying that Social Studies IS NOT important.  Sigh.  Your thoughts?

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Author: erin.almond

God-chaser. NC native, now planted in Jacksonville, FL. Happily married to a handsome church-planting pastor. I am easily excited by Jesus, education, cupcakes, Moleskine notebooks, and Pepsi. Overwhelmed by God's amazing grace, undeserving of His love and mercy.

6 thoughts on “The State of Education in Georgia

  1. It all comes down to No Child Left Behind (NCLB). There is no punishment for failing Social Studies because Social Studies isn’t math or science.

    As long as teachers are required to “teach to the test” we will continue to have low scores. In the 60’s we sent men to the moon using slide rules and the multiplication table because we also gave students back then an understanding of the “Why” of math and not just the “How” of math. Memorizing formulas and loading them into a TI-84 does nothing for our students, their future and the future of the country.

  2. It all comes down to No Child Left Behind (NCLB). There is no punishment for failing Social Studies because Social Studies isn’t math or science.

    As long as teachers are required to “teach to the test” we will continue to have low scores. In the 60’s we sent men to the moon using slide rules and the multiplication table because we also gave students back then an understanding of the “Why” of math and not just the “How” of math. Memorizing formulas and loading them into a TI-84 does nothing for our students, their future and the future of the country.

  3. I agree. As I went through my graduate program in Education, we were all concerned about how to be able to teach the way we wanted, without having to be worried about the test. We didn’t really come to any conclusions.

    The truth is that all subjects (even Social Studies) are important. The lack of knowledge about Social Studies, Government, and Political Science is the reason that so much of America is confused during this election season- and wondering why super delegates matter, what exactly the electoral college is, and what role the play in the election. It’s sad, and until we fix the problems that exist in education, we will never truly have a democracy.

  4. Erin,
    Right now it seems as thought the NCLB is in trouble! Perhaps then Georgia will see an improvement. However, you are right–the statistics are really bad. Where did things go wrong in Georgia? I agree that teaching to the test can sometimes bring low scores, but this is ridiculous! BTW–I run a web blog called Christian Teacher Forum here on WordPress. You may want to check it out since I am trying to network together Christian teachers, whether they are in public, private or home schools.
    Have a great day!

  5. Basically, the way the system works, Social Studies scores do not affect schools making Adequate Yearly Progress..better known as “Made AYP.” Schools place more of an emphasis on teaching subject areas of Reading, ELA, and Math which scores affect schools garnering the valued label of “Made AYP.” What’s even more interesting or scary is Science scores will count next year!

    Another factor to consider is the Georgia Performance Standards. A somewhat rigorous and new curriculum of objectives in which students are having to demonstrate mastery of concepts at an earlier age than in the past.

  6. Somehow i missed the point. Probably lost in translation 🙂 Anyway … nice blog to visit.

    cheers, Nonwhite!!!

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